Towing, Hitching and Tow Vehicles Discussions about tow vehicles, tow systems, hitching, leveling, jacks and more.
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Old 03-05-2016, 08:35 AM   #1
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Default 2006 25' what's right tow vehicle?

I have a HiLo and I'm contemplating either selling or trying on my own. Since I've never towed before wondering what would be best and easiest to operate. I am leaning towards a 4 door truck so could use with odd jobs around house. Any suggestions for this "new bee" to towing?
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Old 03-05-2016, 09:52 AM   #2
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Hi, and welcome to the forum.

I think you'd have the best towing experience with a Super Duty type of truck. Something like a Ford F250, a GM or Dodge 2500.

The reason I recommend these is due to the tongue weight of the 25' HiLo. A smaller truck WILL have enough pulling power to pull the weight of that trailer, but the tongue weight will just about max out the cargo carrying capacity of a smaller truck. You'll have no extra capacity for passengers, luggage and/or camping equipment. The larger truck will give you much more flexibility when you are towing.

Actually, the Super Duty trucks are not that much larger, but they have a greatly increased cargo carrying capacity due to a much stronger suspension. You also have a choice of diesel engines in them if you so desire, and they are great for towing.

Towing is not difficult, but you DO have to get used to it. One thing to remember - the trailer will always follow you - don't spend all your driving time staring in the rear view mirror to make sure it's still there. The hazards are still mostly in front of you.

- Jack
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Old 03-05-2016, 10:36 AM   #3
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I agree with Jack. The biggest factor in having an appropriate tow vehicle is, usually, the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). I'm not sure how this trailer came into your possession if you don't tow, but DO be careful when shopping for a truck. Most dealers will tell you whatever it is they have "will be fine", and in some cases they believe that because they really have no idea what is involved. The GVWR of a truck, as Jack alluded to includes the weight of the truck itself plus all people, gas, gear, and the weight of the tongue of the trailer pushing down on the back of the truck- which in the case of a 25 footer could be 800-- to 1000 lbs, is my guess, when the trailer is loaded. Large SUvs in the 2500-3500 designation, as well as heavy duty vans, can also handle this type of load.

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Old 03-06-2016, 10:30 AM   #4
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Default What type of tow vehicle?

You are very wise to ask for help. We have a 25ft. Classic. Our tow vehicle is aF250 97 Heavy Duty 4x4. It pulls the heavier classic with ease. I see people pulling trailers with 1/2 Tons all the time that I think are not adequate for the tongue wt. and all the gear ect. I know trucks are very expensive. You might consider a used truck.
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Old 03-06-2016, 01:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khhorton08 View Post
I have a HiLo and I'm contemplating either selling or trying on my own. Since I've never towed before wondering what would be best and easiest to operate. I am leaning towards a 4 door truck so could use with odd jobs around house. Any suggestions for this "new bee" to towing?
Hi, and welcome to the forum! You may want to take a look at the Trailer Life Towing guides:

Trailer Towing Guides | Trailer Life Magazine

You are for sure going to need a weight distribution hitch. Good luck!
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Old 03-06-2016, 10:56 PM   #6
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I would disagree a 2500 is necessary for a 5000# trailer. A modern 1500 pickup is more then enough. A modern mid size like a Tacoma or a Canyon would be fine as well. You can always argue a 2500 would be even better but what point do you stop? Why not a 3500, or 5500? Peterbuilt makes a good tow rig. Even towing up to a rating is still perfectly safe, that's why the rating is the rating. If only 60% of the rating was safe then the rating would be that lower number in the first place. You should load your camper and check your weights to make sure. My brother just bought a new F150 3.5 ecoboost crew cab longish bed. That would tow any 25' camper made, let alone a low profile hi-lo. We tow an older 22' towlite with a 2008 Aspen and it's a dream. I don't even have a weight distribution hitch and we load that camper to the max, canned goods, generator, full water tanks, etc. I used to have a 2500 Duramax crew cab with an 8' bed and sure it's great towing, but the 80% of the time you use it normally not towing you are far more dangerous to other on the road with poor handling and long stopping distances not to mention the laws of physics of what would happen if you hit the average car. Sure you are nice and safe but what about the kids in the back seat of that Accord you just climbed the trunk on. See there is an argument to the saftey of others on both sides. You will enjoy day to day life in a 1500 much more and will be just fine towing.
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Old 03-06-2016, 11:35 PM   #7
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There's a reason why a 150/1500 pickup truck is rated at 1/2 ton. As I said, the engine would be plenty strong enough to pull the trailer's weight, but a 5000# trailer is going to add a minimum of 750# to the payload. My truck weighs 6450# with just me in it. It has a GVWR of 7200#.

So, if I were to try to tow that trailer with my 2014 F150 EB, I'd have to leave the Weight Distributing Hitch behind, since it weighs about 70#, and, I could not put any camping equipment or food in the truck bed. I'd also have to leave Janet behind. But, I have no doubt the truck would pull the trailer without any effort, due to the strength of the engine and the transmission.

My Sister has an F250, and it is really no bigger than my truck. And, it gets even better gas mileage, since it's a diesel. She pulls a 4-horse trailer with a gooseneck hitch using it. I've ridden in it when she's not towing and it feels pretty much like my truck.

I'm sticking with my earlier recommendation.

- Jack
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Old 03-07-2016, 11:22 AM   #8
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A 1500 pickup hasn't been referred to a 1/2 ton for probably 30 years. A new F150 has at least a 1650 pound payload rating and can be as high as 2300 pounds. Heck, my minvan has a 3/4 ton payload rating now.

If your Ford is really that porky with that low of a GVWR maybe that's why they went aluminum to shed 700 pounds. If so just avoid pre 2015 f150s. Chevy and Dodge don't run their curb weight to gvwr that tight.
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Old 03-07-2016, 01:02 PM   #9
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OK, I'm honestly not trying to start a fight with you. However, I think the OP needs to consider more than just the so called "weight ratings". My truck is rated to "pull" a trailer weighing 9200#! And, since it has a Base Curb Weight of 5615#, it has a payload capacity of 1520#. It is a 4x4 Super Crew Cab, so it has more weight than the cheepo 4x2 standard cab truck which has a Base Curb Weight of 4935# and a Payload rating of 1920#

Now, Base Curb Weight Rating does not include ANY optional equipment, passengers, etc. My truck has optional things like retractable running boards, bigger wheels, etc. And (full disclosure) I've installed a bed cap that is at least 200#, have a Line-X sprayed in bedliner and I carry a few tools in it. So, when I tell you the weight is 6450#, that's based on what I see on the scales at landfills after I've dropped off the loads I've taken there.

And, unless the truck is equipped with a Heavy Duty Trailer Tow Package (optional), it is limited to a trailer weight of 5000#. I'm pretty sure other truck manufacturers have similar restrictions.

Yes, my truck is probably "porky", but I believe it had "best in class" towing capability for the year it was made.

And, I'm sure the OP could get a 150/1500 class truck that would work. But, he needs to consider more than just the Gross Combined Weight Ratings (GCWR). He needs to KNOW the Vehicle Curb Weight, which includes all optional equipment AND, the tongue weight of the trailer he is towing. Then, he has to respect the GAWR and GVWR of the tow vehicle he is using.

- Jack
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Old 03-07-2016, 03:54 PM   #10
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I agree with Jack , here, especially with regards to KNOWING THE NUMBERS! I bought a new used truck about two years ago and the criteria, aside from value, was the GVWR and actual "curb weight". I went and had the trucks I was considering buying WEIGHED---and I knew my tongue weight which on MY 2001 22 ft Tow Lite is 700 lbs or better with propane filled. The titan curb weight is a few hundred pounds less than many trucks in that range but, believe me, all of them are in the same range ---Meaning Toyota, Dodge, GM , Ford, and Nissan. You CAN buy a brand new f150 ecoboost with the super tow package and get pretty impressive payload numbers......if you want to spend 40k and northward, which I did not. yes, I am assuming many 1500 range vehicles will handle the tongue weight plus gear on a 25ft hi-lo, but not all will have as much "room" left over. With me and gas and the trailer hooked up I've got around 700 lbs of cargo room left to take care of my wife, dog, maybe a canoe, maybe a generator, maybe ....whatever. Bottom line is knowing the numbers. And, in general, a 2500 range vehicle or 3500 will have much more wiggle room. I DISAGREE, however, that a well maintained 2500 range vehicle poses a greater threat to other people on the road than a 1500. I'd like to see definitive data before i would state otherwise. My good friend camps and pulls a trailer with a 3500 chevy passenger van that he has pulled the seats out of -----and I see nothing inherently dangerous with that vehicle. In fact it handles great. In general, 2500 and up do tend to ride rougher when unloaded. But, they definitely have more capacity, usually. Can you "do it" with a vehicle right at or over the "numbers"? Absolutely. My old 97 f150 drove around for years overloaded with a slide in pop-up camper and, later pulled my hi-lo. The GVWR on that was 6000lbs. With just me in it she came in at 5220 curb weight. Really. Add a 1100 lb slide in camper. My wife and I did a whole summer on Colorado national forest roads in that thing and we came out fine. But I was always nervous. And I was never legal. I am, now, happy. But I'd be real content with a 2500 because I know I could put a cap on it and all the canoes I wanted and move to a big trailer if i wanted. know your numbers, know your numbers, know your numbers.

Rick
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