Towing, Hitching and Tow Vehicles Discussions about tow vehicles, tow systems, hitching, leveling, jacks and more.
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Old 05-25-2017, 11:25 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by V8nutz View Post
Well I knew better, the tires were 10 years old, they looked like new but I thought - just one more trip then I'll get some new ones....
When I got my trailer (new) in 2007, BOTH OEM tires failed due to cord separation the following year after less than 5000 miles. They were Load Range C and I had kept them inflated to 50 psi. Thankfully, neither one blew out, but one was smoking and a following motorist alerted me to the problem.

So now I have larger, Load Range D tires mounted and monitor their pressure and temperature with a TPMS.

- Jack
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Old 05-25-2017, 08:11 PM   #12
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Ted, be careful. Jeeps have a short wheelbase. Great for four wheeling but bad for towing. A heavier trailer can really rip you off the road. Some of these new vehicles are built for climbing hills but can make it a nightmare on the highway at higher speeds.
A Jeep Liberty is an SUV - so 4 doors, longer wheelbase, similar to a Cherokee.
Not the longest vehicle, but not the short two-door CJ which DOES have a problem with towing (short wheelbase allows the trailer to drive the tow vehicle).

Not sure the length of the Liberty, but I'd guess 15-16 feet long, so similar wheelbase to a mid size pickup/suv.
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Old 05-27-2017, 01:38 PM   #13
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I am also running D rated tires at 65psi. They work nice.

Another factor related to hi-lo weight is, in my opinion, the added security of all that weight sitting down low. ASsI mentioned last year- I towed right through a dust storm last march in eastern Colorado with approx 45mph side gusts . The wind moved my pick up truck before it moved the trailer. There are disadvantages to living out of a hi-lo but towing is certainly not one of them!
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Old 05-27-2017, 06:58 PM   #14
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Yes, I am starting to worry about going to 14" from 15" now my leaf spring u bolts are pretty close to the road. I hope that isn't going cause me problems down the road. lol I really had no choice though, but to do that, if I wanted to change a flat on the side of the road. it was a nightmare with the 15"135's on it. it does tow nice behind my s-10. I still have to take a look at my surge brake actuator, and drums too. I never seen any jeep I didn't love!
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:00 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Shea View Post
Ted, be careful. Jeeps have a short wheelbase. Great for four wheeling but bad for towing.
Thanks for the advice. For the 1703T with my diesel Jeep Liberty, the only instability so far has been pilot-induced.

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A heavier trailer can really rip you off the road.
What are the mechanics of such an event? As a retired Engineering Consultant I would be interested in knowing.

Thanks,

Ted
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Old 05-27-2017, 11:08 PM   #16
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Ted - I think the issue with a "heavy trailer" is actually a "too heavy" trailer for the tow vehicle, or a mis-loaded trailer (too much weight forward or rearward).

A trailer that's too heavy for the TV will overload the rear of the TV, causing a reduction in loading the front wheels, reducing steering stability (it also alters the caster angle, making the TV steer more "slowly").

Just as important, the over-weight trailer will have excessive positive caster, making the trailer more stable (in that it will resist steering inputs from the TV more).

Also, that excess weight will push on the TV more than it's suspension was designed for - causing the TV to be less stable.

One more thing - an overweight trailer can transition (itself and the tow vehicle) from a over-loaded hitch to an underloaded hitch during acceleration/braking. This can cause serious instability in the TV.

Try to picture the trailer as a mass with a pivot point (both vertical and lateral) at the axle. The tongue is the end of a lever that attaches to the TV.


There's a website that had a great technical breakdown of how it all works...if I can find it again I'll post.


Disclaimer: This is my amateur attempt at an explanation of a somewhat complex system of masses, inertia and moments. I'm sure there are others who have a more accurate description (or correct my errors).
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Old 05-28-2017, 04:36 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KnottyRig View Post
Ted - I think the issue with a "heavy trailer" is actually a "too heavy" trailer for the tow vehicle, or a mis-loaded trailer (too much weight forward or rearward).

A trailer that's too heavy for the TV will overload the rear of the TV, causing a reduction in loading the front wheels, reducing steering stability (it also alters the caster angle, making the TV steer more "slowly").

Just as important, the over-weight trailer will have excessive positive caster, making the trailer more stable (in that it will resist steering inputs from the TV more).

Also, that excess weight will push on the TV more than it's suspension was designed for - causing the TV to be less stable.

One more thing - an overweight trailer can transition (itself and the tow vehicle) from a over-loaded hitch to an underloaded hitch during acceleration/braking. This can cause serious instability in the TV.

Try to picture the trailer as a mass with a pivot point (both vertical and lateral) at the axle. The tongue is the end of a lever that attaches to the TV.


There's a website that had a great technical breakdown of how it all works...if I can find it again I'll post.


Disclaimer: This is my amateur attempt at an explanation of a somewhat complex system of masses, inertia and moments. I'm sure there are others who have a more accurate description (or correct my errors).
Thanks for the further info which is both of great interest and food for thought, especially as to loading of the tow hitch and the effects of braking/acceleration.

Points perhaps to advice about not towing with the camper top up . . .

Ted
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