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Old 08-02-2011, 06:18 PM   #21
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The new Goodyear Marathon tires now have an additional nylon ply, I was told by a tire place, that all manufactures of steel belted trailer tires have now added the nylon ply. He didn't say why but I would think it to be an improvement. Here is a link to the addition of the nylon ply. This type came on my 2209 Hi-Lo, I see that it is only added on selected sizes. Click on product description.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires....R6V2&tab=Sizes
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:52 PM   #22
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Thanks for the Link NDgent - I just got new trailer tires from Discount and they didn't point me to that one.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:02 PM   #23
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Well I got to northern Ohio, Indian Lake near Lima, and had no more problems with tires. I still think it would be a good idea to step up to 225/75 x 15 and possibly to the D rated tire so I could run 65 lbs and have no worries of overloading the tires, plus I would think the extra pressure would give you a little better mileage. I might try that, if any of these tires blow in the next year. We are headed to East Harbor State Park Thursday for 4 days then over to Cleveland at Punderson SP till Labor Day. Oct 1st headed back south thru DC and Santee S.C. and Ocala National Forest. Hope to meet up with some of you guys this winter in the west.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:55 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by captbobster View Post
Well I got to northern Ohio, Indian Lake near Lima, and had no more problems with tires. I still think it would be a good idea to step up to 225/75 x 15 and possibly to the D rated tire so I could run 65 lbs and have no worries of overloading the tires, plus I would think the extra pressure would give you a little better mileage. I might try that, if any of these tires blow in the next year. We are headed to East Harbor State Park Thursday for 4 days then over to Cleveland at Punderson SP till Labor Day. Oct 1st headed back south thru DC and Santee S.C. and Ocala National Forest. Hope to meet up with some of you guys this winter in the west.
I agree with your reasoning - totally! Provided the tires will fit. I could not have mounted these before I had my axle moved forward. Now, with the axle moved forward 3 inches, and the axle dropped 1 1/2 inches from the frame, there's no problem at all.

- Jack
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Old 08-24-2011, 06:53 AM   #25
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I've looked at my wheel wells and spacing and I can't see a problem with going to the next size tire. They are only 1.2 inches bigger in diameter and .8 inches wider and I seem to have plenty of room all around on my 2807. My car tires are way oversized for my car and that is from the factory, so I am thing about the same kind of safety factor on the trailer.
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Old 08-24-2011, 08:28 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by captbobster View Post
Well I got to northern Ohio, Indian Lake near Lima, and had no more problems with tires. I still think it would be a good idea to step up to 225/75 x 15 and possibly to the D rated tire so I could run 65 lbs and have no worries of overloading the tires, plus I would think the extra pressure would give you a little better mileage. I might try that, if any of these tires blow in the next year. We are headed to East Harbor State Park Thursday for 4 days then over to Cleveland at Punderson SP till Labor Day. Oct 1st headed back south thru DC and Santee S.C. and Ocala National Forest. Hope to meet up with some of you guys this winter in the west.
HI Bob
See you are headed toward DC. If you get near Charlottesville VA, we live just off I64 and have full hook-ups if you are looking for a overnite stay. Enjoy meeting HiLo owners. We are in Novia Scotia now but plan to get back home around 9/5.
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Old 08-25-2011, 12:05 AM   #27
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Default changing tire size

The tires looked real good when we got our 90 HiLo. The previous owner has a tire shop. Further down the road one tire was defective and we had no claim for reimbursement as we did not origionaly purchase them. Finaly our HiLo dealer noticed the tire was rubbing on the underside of the wheel well and they repaired the damage so we didn't get water intrusion. Even though the tire was slightly wider it caused dammage. PopRichie expressed this concern. If you want a second opinion maybe you can call or e-mail JR repair in Ohio. We have all new tires on the trailer. Just want you to get your tire upgrade done correctly. Tires aren't cheap.
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Old 10-12-2011, 10:48 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by campthewestcoast View Post
Which is best for trailer tires, radial or bias ply?
Depends what you intend to use your trailer for. I've had better luck with radial trailer tires on my boat trailer since we haul the boat several hundred miles on our annual fishing trip to Canada. Radials seem to sway less when travelling at high speeds. I've used Carlisle, Duro and Towmaster radial trailer tires over the last 10 years. When I keep them at maximum air pressure, they all seem to last about the same amount of time/miles. Bought my last pair of trailer tires at boattrailertires.com. Seemed to be great pricing and they arrived in 2 days. Hope my posting helps a good vendor....doesn't seem like there are many vendors online that I'd call "good" these days!
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Old 10-12-2011, 04:59 PM   #29
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Default Trailer Tire Facts http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoTrailerTireFacts.dos

Trailer Tire Facts - Discount Tire
Trailer Tire Applications:
  • Trailer tires are designed for use on trailer axle positions only. They are not built to handle the loads applied to, or the traction required by, drive or steering axles.
  • An "LT" designation on a trailer tire size specifies load range only. It is not designed for use on light trucks.
  • Do not mount "ST" or "LT" trailer tires on passenger cars or light trucks.
Inflation
  • Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
  • Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
  • If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
  • Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity:
  • All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
  • The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
  • The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
  • If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
  • If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.
Speed:
  • All "ST" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.
  • As heat builds up, the tire's structure starts to disintegrate and weaken.
  • The load carrying capacity gradually decreases as the heat and stresses generated by higher speed increases.
Time:
  • Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire.
  • In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone.
  • Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire.
  • It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Mileage:
  • Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
  • The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
  • The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles.
Why Use An "ST" Tire:
  • "ST" tires feature materials and construction to meet the higher load requirements and demands of trailering.
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Old 10-13-2011, 12:02 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDgent View Post
Trailer Tire Facts - Discount Tire
Trailer Tire Applications:
  • Trailer tires are designed for use on trailer axle positions only. They are not built to handle the loads applied to, or the traction required by, drive or steering axles.
  • An "LT" designation on a trailer tire size specifies load range only. It is not designed for use on light trucks.
  • Do not mount "ST" or "LT" trailer tires on passenger cars or light trucks.
Inflation
  • Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
  • Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
  • If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
  • Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity:
  • All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
  • The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
  • The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
  • If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
  • If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.
Speed:
  • All "ST" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.
  • As heat builds up, the tire's structure starts to disintegrate and weaken.
  • The load carrying capacity gradually decreases as the heat and stresses generated by higher speed increases.
Time:
  • Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire.
  • In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone.
  • Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire.
  • It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Mileage:
  • Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
  • The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
  • The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles.
Why Use An "ST" Tire:
  • "ST" tires feature materials and construction to meet the higher load requirements and demands of trailering.
Nice write-up, what size tire and load rating are you running on your towlite?
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