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Old 06-15-2015, 07:24 AM   #1
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Default Tire pressure

What tire pressure do you run with?
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Old 06-15-2015, 07:42 AM   #2
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There are many opinions on this but I just run mine at max inflation as stated on the sidewall of the tire. I inflated my Goodyear Marathons (Load Range C) to 50 psi and my Maxxis (Load Range D) to 65 psi.
Hope this helps.

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Old 06-15-2015, 09:19 AM   #3
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My trailer tires have 50 psi on them. In warm weather, I usually inflate to 47-48 psi. Just my aversion to blowouts. Just got back from a 3260 mile trip. Hubs and tires barely got warm. YMMV.
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Old 06-15-2015, 12:57 PM   #4
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Run max pressure checked cold and out of the sun. It's OK and normal for them to go over max pressure when driven, the pressure is max when cold and what trailer tires are supposed to be run at.
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Old 06-15-2015, 03:24 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hersbird View Post
Run max pressure checked cold and out of the sun. It's OK and normal for them to go over max pressure when driven, the pressure is max when cold and what trailer tires are supposed to be run at.
That's my understanding and what I do too! According to everything I've read on the subject, heat buildup is caused by sidewall flexing, and that is minimized at higher pressures. Also, the load rating of the tire assumes the tire is inflated at the max (cold) pressure. At a lower pressure, the load handling ability is reduced.

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Old 06-15-2015, 07:47 PM   #6
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I believe the maximum pressure is the only way to go, both the tire marking and the the weight rating sticker on the side of the trailer say 50 psi.

Also, make sure you have a good quality pressure gauge, the cheap pencil type are notoriously inaccurate.
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Old 06-16-2015, 07:29 AM   #7
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Thanks everyone for the help.
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Old 07-25-2015, 01:25 AM   #8
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I don't know why everyone on the forum seems to recommend running at the maximum specified pressure indicated on the tire. The tire manufacturers themselves do not recommend that. Instead, they give a chart that shows the proper inflation depending on the amount of load the tire carries.

On some tire manufacturer sites, they tell you that serious over-inflation will make the tires less flexible and more prone to damage when hitting rocks or potholes or other road hazards. Tires also provide some cushioning of the load and if over-inflated, your trailer is subjected to a lot harsher shaking on gravel or uneven roads. Aside from scrambling the contents of your cabinets, that can also loosen up joints throughout the trailer.

My approach to the tire problem was to buy what folks consider to be really good tires (Maxxus ST Radial 8008) and of a capacity greater than the original equipment (load range D/8 ply rating, instead of load range C/6 ply rating). Then I looked at the Maxxus pressure table and determined that with a generous estimate of my loaded trailer weight, each of the 4 tires only needed to be inflated to about 34 psi. The maximum inflation of these tires is 65 psi.

I confess I just could not do that. I've always inflated vehicle tires a bit more than the manufacturer recommendations. So I settled on 45 psi. According to the chart, that's adequate for a trailer weighing almost half again what my Hi-Lo does. Still, that's a long way from the 65 psi maximum, which would handle a trailer almost twice as heavy. I feel like I've made a decent compromise.

The other thing I do is treat my tires decently on the highway. I drive a maximun of 60-65 mph even on the freeway, which here in Idaho now has an 80 mph speed limit. I'm a lot more comfortable with that speed too; even with the Hi-Lo's electric brakes the stopping distance is going to be a lot greater than without the trailer, etc. And after all, most trailer-specific tires are only rated for up to 65 mph.

I do see plenty of folks towing their trailers and huge 5th-wheels on the freeway at 80. Of course, that causes a lot more heat build up in the tire sidewalls, which is the cause of most tire failure. I think a lot of folks just put the maximum pressure into their tires so the sidewalls flex less, especially on hot summer days. They reason they can tow at what I think are unsafe speeds with whatever tires they have.

I'm sure not everyone will agree with this, but I thought another opinion might just be something to consider.

Roger
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Old 07-25-2015, 01:19 PM   #9
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From Etrailer- "Special trailer tires should be inflated to their maximum air pressure."

From Discount Tire Direct - "Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall."

From West Marine - "Maintain pressure at the maximum PSI recommended on the tire’s sidewall for cool running, load-carrying ability and lowest rolling resistance."

I could go on and on from 100 trailer and tire experts. I see the chart from Maxxis you are talking about but they are showing the limits for various pressures, I don't see where they recommend running at the lower pressure just because you might have a few pounds to spare.
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Old 08-20-2015, 09:40 PM   #10
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May I suggest that tire dealers do not warrant tires, thought that was a manufacture's responsibility.

If trailer tires run and last so much better at the max allowed inflation can't see why truck and passenger would not benefit from max inflation also.

As one who has a 2007 2500 Dodge Diesel 4x4 tire inflation makes a world of difference when not fully loaded. (read bone jarring rough). Can just imagine what the ride in a trailer must be like with max inflation and not max load.
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Old 08-21-2015, 02:49 PM   #11
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Default Tires pressure

When I put the last set of Goodyear Marathons on the Hi Lo I asked this question of the dealer along with what he saw as the biggest problem that caused tire failure. UNDERFLATION. He recommended running the tires at max on tire which printed on the tire. .......50 psi. I always check my tires early in the morning and while they are cold. Also check every morning before I tow the camper. You'd be surprised how they can loose pressure while traveling.
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Old 08-22-2015, 01:10 PM   #12
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Papa, it's wonderful to hear your "voice" again on the forum. Hope everything is going well with you, the children, and the grandchildren.

Concerning the tire pressure, we use the X-chocks between the tires on each side of the camper when we are setting up the camper on a site. We ratchet tight these chocks to prevent camper movement or shaking while we are walking around inside the camper. (However, a lot of people use them in lieu of the ground chocks which is not good and not what they are meant for.). We notice that after a few hours those X-chocks loosen up between the tires and have to be re tightened. Possibly, it's because the tires have cooled down after being on the road for a long time and have lost some tire pressure. Beach checks tire pressure before we leave home, but I think we are more neglectful of that when we are breaking camp to come home. We were given the same advice as you when we purchased our new load-D Marathons to replace those lousy load-C tires that were on the camper when we purchased it. If I remember correctly, you were getting ready to replace or had replaced your tires with load-D Marathons when we were at the rally in Tennessee. I think that's what spurred us on to go ahead and replace with load-D Marathons.

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Old 08-22-2015, 01:38 PM   #13
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Cooling tires and the corresponding reduction in pressure is a good hypothesis. Do the chocks stay tight once you've retightened them after cooling? If so, I'd say you've got a very good theory.

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Old 08-22-2015, 03:23 PM   #14
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Jack, yes they did. We even leave the ratchet wrench on the X-chocks now knowing we will have to re tighten them and, of course, for the purpose of knowing where the wrench is and not scratching our heads in a senior moment as to what we did with the darn wrench.

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Old 08-22-2015, 05:40 PM   #15
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"However, a lot of people use them in lieu of the ground chocks which is not good and not what they are meant for.)"

Why is that? I've got a set and usually at least put one side on to prevent movement especially If I am on a bit of an incline for some reason. I thought the purpose of all chocks was to prevent the trailer from rolling.

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Old 08-22-2015, 07:30 PM   #16
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Rick, I think she's saying it's best to use both kinds at once.

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Old 08-23-2015, 04:13 PM   #17
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hill, when we purchased the X-chocks (2), I read the literature that came in the boxes, and it said that the X-chocks were to be specifically used for stabilizing the floor of the Hi-Lo while using the camper after setup. In fact, the literature had a big warning and disclaimer from liability in it to not use the X-chocks for braking the camper from rolling off the camping site. I said to myself "ah, the company is just trying to cover their rearend from any liability." But one incident changed my mind. When we first got these things, we followed the instructions as to how to use them, but we may have been in a little bit of a hurry when we installed one of them and didn't tighten one X-chock enough OR during the night the tires constricted from cooling after being on the road all day. Consequently, when we got up the next morning, we casually noticed that the X-chock on the tires next to the entrance door had fallen to the ground and fallen over. We had not used any ground chocks. Thank goodness that the X-chock on the opposite side of the camper held. Since that time, we have never EVER used the X-chocks without ground chocks.

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Old 08-23-2015, 09:59 PM   #18
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Good to know. Thanks, Dee

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Old 08-24-2015, 02:36 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy1 View Post
May I suggest that tire dealers do not warrant tires, thought that was a manufacture's responsibility.

If trailer tires run and last so much better at the max allowed inflation can't see why truck and passenger would not benefit from max inflation also.

As one who has a 2007 2500 Dodge Diesel 4x4 tire inflation makes a world of difference when not fully loaded. (read bone jarring rough). Can just imagine what the ride in a trailer must be like with max inflation and not max load.
There is a large group of people and engineers who do think running automotive and truck tires at their max is the way to go. They know that is where they will last the longest and give the lowest rolling resistance. Manufactures use the tires as a band aid to cover up porr suspension design. That was 100% the problem with Ford Explorers and their Firestones. In order to keep them from rolling over like a Suzuki Sidekick they found if they ran the tires low enough it was less likely to roll. Problem was they set it so low the tires built so much heat they catastrophicly failed. Same with so many reviewers, they want such a floating on air ride where you have no feel of the road at all. Me I'll take feeling a few seams a bit more to save some gas and get more miles on the tires. My car tires are 45-50 and my truck tires were at 75 all the time.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:55 PM   #20
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I would suggest that looking at tires/tire pressure alone is ignoring that tires/tire pressure is only one part of an inter-related system to provide the best suspension needed. If you only drive super smooth highways than over-inflated(per load requirements) tires will be of little concern. Vehicle/trailer components can suffer from over-inflated tires when encountering rough road conditions. (pot-holes, railroad tracks, trash on roadway, bridge drops and rises)

As has been stated the problem is UNDER-INFLATION for the tire loading. I have read that individual tires can have different loading for any given vehicle load configuration and must be taken into account to determine the proper tire size and pressure. So even doing a total load scale weight will not address this individual tire loading problem. Another major factor for torsion axle trailers is the front to rear level of the trailer.

Am not an expert on any of this, but have to go by manufacture (tire, axle, trailer, TV) recommendations and the engineering used to build a suspension system.
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