RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 
 


General Hi-Lo camper discussion The perfect place to discuss your Hi-Lo camper
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-09-2011, 03:30 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Glide OR
Posts: 17
Default Not to PLEASED

We bought a 2004 17 t and it looked to be in great shape. Yesterday while the wife and I were in the trailer looking at what we needed to go camping and where it would go and the top set of hinges in the top door pulled free and the door was hanging by the bottom hinges. I took a look to see what would be needed to fix it and found that it had been repaired once before and not very well. I did some digging around and found out how to pull the door jam out and bought some stainless steel screws with nylon self locking nuts and some washers to back up the nuts. I want to make sure this does not happen again. Is this a problem with the trailers? The hinges were riveted in place and from the looks of it who ever did the repair did not use long enough rivets and the simply pulled loose. I truely hate shoody repair work. Normally it would not bother me but I only have a few days before we take off and the weather is not conducent to working on a camp trailer and I have a celebration of life to attend for a boy hood friend.
__________________

__________________
[FONT="Century Gothic"]Chuck[/FONT
Charliek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 03:37 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: San Bernardino, Ca.
Posts: 224
Default

That's not a normal repair but it sounds like you were able to get it taken care of. I have seen the lower door piano hinge on a 1996 22' classic that had several cracks through it but it still functioned fine. . My guess is a child tried hanging on your door or someone fell against it and grabbed it to slow their fall. I hate shoddy repairs also. Especially when they aren't disclosed. These trailers were built by everyday people and as such, they can usually be repaired fairly easily by the owner if the time is taken to look into it. When the job is rushed is when it usually gets botched.

My condolances for your friends passing.
__________________

Fireballsocal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 04:23 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Glide OR
Posts: 17
Default

Ok I got the frame out of the way and the rest is easy. To do this repair you will need a #2 square drive screw driver, a standard phillips head screw driver and a roll of 1/2 or 1 inch wide putty tape. I have a drill that is variable speed which makes it much easier. First thing to do is remove the screen door by removing the screws, mine were phillips head, then remove the door by unscrewing the hinges from the door. At this point all the weight is off the door jamp and it is easier to work on. Remove the beauty plastic from around the door jamb and you will find a series of screws holding the door jamb on. Mine were square drive which is much nicer.Remove the bottom few screws and then lower the trailer down to make it easier to work on so you don't have to stand on a ladder. Also remove the rain guard. Using a putty knife, being careful not to scratch your surface slide, it in between the house and the door jamp working it up or down depending on where you start. Once the door jamb is loose you can gently remove it. Mine had no hidden screews and came off easily. The putty has a tendancy to seal tightly and makes it a bit on the difficult side. Take your time and don'e bend anything as it only takes a few minutes to remove the jamb after it is loosened up. I took the time to make some pencil marks on the house so I would know approx where to look for some holes. Because I am using screws with nuts on them I am using the exsisting holes where the rivets were to align my nuts so I can counter sink the holes to accept the nuts. Clean all the putty off and throw it away. Do what repair work you need to do and make sure every thing fits before doing the re-assembly work. When you are have every thing done do a test fit to make sure your rivets or in my case screws with nuts fit like they are supposed to. With the putty tape go around the door housing with the making a single pass with not gaps or tears. If it does tear it is easily repairable a single layer is plenty, next set your jamb in place and start putting in the screws being careful not to strip out the holes as they are only going into wood and will strip pretty easily. After the door jamb is secure do the same with the rain shield then hang your door and screen door. You will want to remove the latch for the door before taking off the jamb as the screws that hold it in place also go into the wood. I used a pencil to mark an outline so I would know how to put it back together with out a bunch of trial and error. After the door jamb is in place use a dull putty knife to score the putty that is sticking out of the jamb to make a clean job. I would strongly suggest you have somebody holding the door for you while you remove it so something else does not get damaged. In my case my wife is very willing to help and also makes a great go-fer for me. But then again she used to help me rebuild engines also so she is a pretty good helper and is great for getting me out of tight spots when I forget something. If you are not mechanicaly inclined or good at fixing things take it to a repair shop. If you are good at fixing things on a level of 1 to 10 this might have a difficulty of about a 3. I am much happier now that I know this is going to be an easy fix.
__________________
[FONT="Century Gothic"]Chuck[/FONT
Charliek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 04:27 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
JMDoering's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 586
Default

Hi Chuck,

My condolences also.

Basically, Hi-Lo's are well made. Sorry for your bum luck with the door. I agree with Fireball that this was probably caused by a previous owner. I really doubt it was factory made this way as too many years have passed for it not to have been properly fixed sooner.

If you bought the trailer from a private individual, it could be they just weren't competent enough with tools to repair the door correctly.

If you bought from a used trailer dealer and they did the repair, the poor workmanship may have been more of a greed and poor ethics issue than competency. We bought our current Hi-Lo used, from a dealer. The dealer quickly gave us the impression that they wanted to unload this "odd goose," trailer as quickly as they could, with as little cost to them as possible. We insisted on several relatively minor repairs, under the negotiated price, and they completed them. Having written this, I'll also say that a junior high school shop student could have done a better job. The repairs were clearly knocked out as quickly as possible with little concern for "doing it the right way." Every thing they did, I either reworked myself, or had our long term "regular," technician redo.

Sounds like you have some good handyman repair skills... those are priceless if you own a trailer, as little repairs are always popping up! Plus there is routine preventive maintenance that must be done. But for bigger jobs, or those beyond your comfort level, go by referral and find an honest, reliable, knowledgeable and professional trailer repair technician in your area and build a loyal relationship. You won't regret it!

Jim
__________________
1967 17' Hi-Lo Bon Voyage (1967-1969)
1969 19' Hi-Lo Bon Voyage (1969-2011)
2004 27' Hi-Lo TowLite (2010-present)
2015 Chevy Tahoe LTZ
JMDoering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 09:38 PM   #5
sam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Niagara Falls,NY
Posts: 3,850
Default Door repair

Your trailer is seven years old. You have to expect some repairs along the way. I agree the bottom door probably got leaned on or a hard push against it. We had to repair our bottom door twice. We then then learned not to lean on it and to use a handrail instead of leaning on the door. We also had to do a mjor repair on the top half of the door. 90 Classic 25 ft.HiLo. I also am a great helper clean up person. I'm also the supervisor/quality contyrol inspector. Some times hubby tries to take a short cut where there is none. Relax ,you will do fine with your pre-loved/enjoyed HiLo. It,is a big plus that your handy..Just think about all the money you will save and can use it to fill your gas tank. Just take some basic tools with you. Duct tape,calk ,shims and bailing wire will fix just about anything. We are here for you on all your adventures.
sam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 11:16 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Glide OR
Posts: 17
Default

I know that there are repairs, just got caught by surprise. As for being a bit skilled I was "A" gang in the Navy as well as a diesel mech. I even bought a 63 Layton and built it to fit my needs after gutting the inside and replace all wood rot. I did all the 110 and 12 wiring, plumbing etc. I even put in a Bosch tankless water heater. Nothing like a nice pleasantly warm shower with no limit to hot water. I lived in it for two school years while I attended my jr n sr year in college. I suppose I shouldn't be upset as it is used, just a bit on the frustrated side cause it is such a dang nice trailer. I decided against using the screws with nuts as there is not room for the outboard rivet. So I stopped and got some steel rivets and will put steel washers that fit a #10 screw as a backing that way they should not come out again. Just as a precaution because the hinge holes are a little large I will use a washer on each sid of the rivet. Thanks for the condolances for my friend. My appologies for sounding off the way I did.
__________________
[FONT="Century Gothic"]Chuck[/FONT
Charliek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2011, 12:29 AM   #7
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Napa,CA
Posts: 881
Default

Sam,

Your list was missing the superglue.
__________________
Les

2006 22ft towlite (replaces 97 21TL)
2006 Toyota tacoma pre-runner 4.0 L V-6 quad cab
w/ 98 chevy Powervision towing mirrors
campthewestcoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2011, 12:50 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
JMDoering's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 586
Default

Sam,

I see duct tape is at the top of your list. Mine too... and has been ever since, years ago, I was on an airline flight delayed on the tarmac due to some mechanical problem, so the pilot announced. I looked out the window there strolls a mechanic with a big roll of duct tape in his hand. Not another tool in sight!

So if its good enough for a Boeing, its good enough for a Hi-Lo. At least for a while...

Jim
__________________
1967 17' Hi-Lo Bon Voyage (1967-1969)
1969 19' Hi-Lo Bon Voyage (1969-2011)
2004 27' Hi-Lo TowLite (2010-present)
2015 Chevy Tahoe LTZ
JMDoering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2011, 12:41 PM   #9
TJM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ballwin,Missouri
Posts: 148
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by campthewestcoast View Post
Sam,

Your list was missing the superglue.
Les,

Finishing up some last minute items for our trek. We are leaving 9hopefully) at 5 a.m. Tuesday. Will be going to Aubrey (dallas) Texas for a few nights to see our son, daughter in law and grand daughter. We leave there early a.m. on Friday, go to KOA in Carlsbad, NM stay there overnight then leave early a.m. Saturday and go to KOA in Benson, AZ. Finally, we will leave there Sunday a.m. and drive to Alpine, California where will we stay at Ma-Tar-Awa Indian reservation for eight nights before heading up north. Will keep you posted. Tom and Judy
__________________
1996 22'Hi-Lo
2001 Toyota Tacoma
TJM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2011, 01:25 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Glide OR
Posts: 17
Default

Do you realize how hard it is to get a bottle of super glue or a roll of duck tape when you are a thousand miles out to sea and you realize there is none left. We never had a store to go to so sometimes we just had to do without. But oddly enough we could usually find some old used bubble gum and a little bit of bailing wire and if you are ingenious enough you can still fix most anything with it. I remember one time when we were in a really bad storm and had to fix this leak in a pipe and it was fix it or sink and we were almost done and realized we were about an inch short a
__________________
[FONT="Century Gothic"]Chuck[/FONT
Charliek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2011, 12:48 AM   #11
sam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Niagara Falls,NY
Posts: 3,850
Default Repairs

My items on the repair list were in no partyicular order. Back in the old days you were lucky if their was one kind of glue. Today we have huge totes full of glue. Super glue has its place,just don;t get it on your hands. Every time I go to Walmart it seems like the makers of gorilla glue have come out with some new and improved product. Today I brought back my totes of shampoo ect. The things that would freeze and explode if left in the Hi Lo. 77degrees today!! Had a blast with the radio on re organizing the "junk drawer" in the HiLo. Reality sets in tomorrow back to 50degrees.
Wouldn't it be great if we could get together and help each other do our repairs. Thinking like an Amish barn raising!!!
__________________

sam is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Hi-Lo Trailers Worldwide or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
HiLoTrailerForum.com Copyright 2010
×